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KHS Historical Marker Honors Railroad Line and Depot Critical to Bourbon Country Growth

Wednesday, 08 28, 2013

CONTACT: Becky Riddle
502-564-1792, ext. 4474
becky.riddle@ky.gov.

 

  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

CONTACT: Becky Riddle

502-564-1792, ext. 4474

becky.riddle@ky.gov.

 

KHS Historical Marker Honors Railroad Line and Depot Critical to Bourbon Country Growth 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Aug. 28, 2013) — The Kentucky Historical Society (KHS) will dedicate a historical marker to commemorate the Frankfort and Cincinnati Railroad and the Centreville Depot. The event begins at 1:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 7, at KY 353 at Centreville (near Paris), Ky.

The line is considered a major factor in the growth of Frankfort in the late 1890s as well as an important distribution method for the area’s bourbon distilleries during much of the last century. Originally named the Kentucky Midland Railroad, the 40-mile span between Frankfort and Paris was built from 1888 to 1890. The name changed to Frankfort and Cincinnati in 1899, although there were no connections to Cincinnati. With the advent of the automobile, the tracks in Bourbon County were abandoned in 1967, and by 1987 all had been removed.

The Centreville Depot, built in 1889, was stop 32 on the line. George R. Burberry became the depot agent-telegrapher in 1892. He and his family also operated the Centreville Commission Co. there, selling coal, grain and fertilizer. The depot served as a commercial center for the community until it burned in 1963.

The Kentucky Historical Marker Program, administered by KHS in cooperation with the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, tells Kentucky’s story through the people, places and events that have shaped local communities across the Commonwealth. These markers highlight the importance of place in Kentucky’s collective history in order to build strong communities for the future. The markers are on-the-spot history lessons that make connections between history, place and historical evidence housed in the Commonwealth’s many historical organizations. Through the program, Kentucky’s history is made accessible to the public on markers along the state’s roadways, online at www.history.ky.gov/markers and via the Explore Kentucky History smartphone application available free at iTunes and Google Play.


For more information, contact Becky Riddle, Kentucky Historical Marker program coordinator, at 502-564-1792, ext. 4474 or
becky.riddle@ky.gov.

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An agency of the Kentucky Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet and accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, the Kentucky Historical Society, established in 1836, is committed to helping people understand, cherish and share Kentucky's history by providing connections to the past, perspective on the present and inspiration for the future. The KHS history campus includes the Thomas D. Clark Center for Kentucky History, the Old State Capitol and the Kentucky Military History Museum at the State Arsenal. For more information about the Kentucky Historical Society and its programs, visit www.history.ky.gov.